Weight Loss

OMAD Diet vs Intermittent Fasting (16/8): Should You Eat One Meal a Day

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OMAD Diet vs Intermittent Fasting (16/8): Should You Eat One Meal a Day – Thomas DeLauer

Prolonged fasting, intermittent fasting, crescendo fasting, and now one meal a day fasting. What the heck are we supposed to do? Well, let’s take a look at the various forms of fasting, and in this video, let’s really break down the one meal a day, OMAD diet, to intermittent fasting in a 16:8 style. So what I wanna do in this video is help you understand these two types of fasting and what might work better for you by looking at three very reputable studies.

All right, first and foremost, what the heck is the OMAD diet? It’s something that’s gaining popularity a lot recently, and what it stands for is one meal a day. So essentially, it is a form of intermittent fasting, just in a little bit more of an extreme sense. So in essence what you’re doing is you’re fasting for 23 or 23 1/2 hours, and then you’re consolidating all of your calories into one meal per day. It sounds a little bit intense, and quite honestly it is. Now, more commonly a lot of us know intermittent fasting as something that’s more of 16 hour fast, eight hour eating window. So what I’d like to do is I’d like to compare OMAD to 16:8, but I’d also like to compare it to the overall traditional three square meals a day. Morning, midday, and dinner.

So the first thing that I wanna do is I wanna dive into this one study that was published in the American Journal of Clinical Investigation. It was an eight week study that took a look at two groups, okay? One group consumed traditional three square meals, okay? Morning, midday, and evening. The other group consumed one meal a day. And they wanted to look at overall body composition results and what actually happened after eight weeks of eating like this. So what they did do is they had each of these subjects eat the right amount of calories to maintain their body weight. So each person ate a different amount, but it was all relative to what they weighed and what it would take to keep them weighing roughly the same. So what they found at the end of the study is that both groups stayed roughly the same weight. However, the one meal a day group lost on average 4.6 pounds where the other group lost 3.1. So we’re still pretty close, but the one meal a day group did lose a little bit more body weight.

Now both groups ended up maintaining their lean body mass the same, so there wasn’t any loss in muscle, but there was a little bit of loss in fat. Now this is all fine and dandy, and we really like the science, and we like knowing that one meal a day is gonna allow you to burn a little bit more fat than three square meals, but that’s really not that aggressive. That’s honestly not enough to convince me to consolidate all of my eating into a 30 minute window. So let’s take a look at another study that was published in the Journal of Translational Medicine, and this study took a look at more of a 16:8 fasting window versus typical breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

References

1) A controlled trial of reduced meal frequency without caloric restriction in healthy, normal-weight, middle-aged adults. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2645638/

2) Impact of Reduced Meal Frequency Without Caloric Restriction on Glucose Regulation in Healthy, Normal Weight Middle-Aged Men and Women. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2121099/#R28

3) Omad Diet- One Meal A Day Diet. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://omaddiet.com

4) Effects of eight weeks of time-restricted feeding (16/8) on basal metabolism, maximal strength, body composition, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk factors in resistance-trained males. (2016, October 13). Retrieved from

5) Effects of eight weeks of time-restricted feeding (16/8) on basal metabolism, maximal strength, body composition, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk factors in resistance-trained males. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5064803/

6) 16:8 fasting diet actually works, study finds. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322194.php

7) Effects of 8-hour time restricted feeding on body weight and metabolic disease risk factors in obese adults: A pilot study – IOS Press. (2018, June 15). Retrieved from https://content.iospress.com/articles/nutrition-and-healthy-aging/nha170036#ref010

8) Trepanowski JF , et al. (n.d.). Effect of Alternate-Day Fasting on Weight Loss, Weight Maintenance, and Cardioprotection Among Metabolically Healthy Obese Adults: A Randomized Cli… – PubMed – NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28459931

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